Parricides
By Zainab Khan

April 28th 2008
No child ever imagines himself murdering his parentsÖyet parental murders occur. When we hear of an adult son arrested for his fatherís murder, we find it dreadfully shocking but when an adolescent is taken in for his parentís murder, we are shocked beyond bounds. Although cases involving parental murders account for only 2% of the homicides, they are becoming increasingly frequent and have almost become a daily event in the United States.

These children are not people with a set criminal record nor are they habitually related to violent acts. No, they are not members of gangs that bully and wreak trouble for the fun of it. These children are but victims of provoking and desperate circumstances and surroundings. True, many adults who are sane and are fully capable of foreseeing the immenseness of their acts kill their parents for mere motives of property and inheritance. And in rare cases siblings conspire against their parents and work on the plan together. Imagine. On the other hand, teenagers who murder their parents are mostly physically, sexually or verbally abused and neglected individuals. After recurrent disturbing events that occur around them and with them, they lose hope thinking that because no action has been taken up till now, the only way of ending it all is by snuffing the source. The teen age years are known for their fragility; youngsters already burdened with an unstable family life and poor parental supervision and guidance act out of sheer desperation because they know that their options are limited. They have fewer alternatives as compared to adults because they are dependant on their parents for financial support. They have no jobs, a place to go to and no means of living on their own. Although more than 90% parricides (the murdering of oneís father, mother, or near relative) are abused by their parents. There are a few other long term causes behind these crimes. Some are severely mentally ill and oblivious to their actions. Others are children who are isolated and direly anti social, are quick on choosing what are known as the last resorts. They donít have company to distract and calm them down, and so they live within their own minds. They fabricate thoughts out of the older thoughts and after a while, they are so pushed into negativity that they become a danger even to themselves. But the restrictions placed upon them by their parents also irritate the anti social teenagers. At other times, they do it simply to buy drugs.

How terrible it is to see that there are thousands of children on this earth who crave for parental affection and then there are those who are willing to commit their parentís murder is immeasurable. It is insanity to kill for money and property (or for any other reason for that matter) when really, the struggle and the hard work they put in is to see the future of their kids secured. As for parents who abuse their children and make life at home intolerable for them, they should know that it isnít only them who have rights over there children but children too have rights over their parents. If mere feeding and homage were the responsibilities of the parents, then any financial provider could be a parent. But life is more than money and food: there are people who are not so well off, living in peace because they value and respect their family members and show love and warmth towards them.

It really is something of a realization that our being nice to those who around us can really change the entire perspective that they have of their lives. It doesnít matter whether they appear to be in need of it or not, because ultimately each one of us needs a comforting hand to hold. Vivaciousness and a positive outlook on life are remarkably infectious; why not share a bit of it with others. And anyway, there is never a chance of running out of it, is there?

Searching for this topic has been an experience for myself and I hope that parents and children who read this do realize that the families that saw such horrors werenít much far from the ordinary.

Sources:
www.psychologytoday.com
www.nlada.org


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